QuickReview: LIFX White 800 WiFi LED Smart Bulb – the foremind

Lately I have been dipping my toe into the pool of home automation and smarthome technologies.  While I have been interested in having a smarthome ever since I watched my first few episodes of the SyFy channel show Eureka.  My interest was advanced even more by Google I/O 2016 and the demo of Google Assistant.

So a few months ago I ventured into this new world of technology (new for me at least) cautiously by purchasing a pair of the LIFX White 800 smart bulbs that were on sale at Walmart due to the release of the LIFX Generation 3 A19.

I found that the Android app was very easy to configure, and that I could easily add the light bulbs to multiple Android devices.  I was disappointed to find that they were not immediately compatible Siri on my wife’s iPhone due to the lack of a suitable homekit bridge/hub.  This was remedied easily enough by configuring the open-source NodeJS server homebridge and a plugin (homebridge-lifx-lan or homebridge-lifx)  to connect the light bulbs to the Apple Home application.

Adding the lightbulbs to the LIFX app on my Pixel was fairly straight forward and went off without a hitch.

I have found the light bulbs easy enough to manage.  The hue range and brightness are quite suitable for the application, namely the nightstand lights in the master bedroom and I would definitely recommend these to anyone that doesn’t have a need for more than just white led light bulbs.

Workaround for HipChat on openSUSE – the foremind

I recently re-built my work laptop to run openSUSE due to continual crashes of GNOME Shell on my Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 spin.  One of the apps that we use at work is Atlassian’s HipChat client.  HipChat has an artifactory repo where you can download the rpm bundle for use on CentOS, openSUSE, Fedora, etc.  After installing the client I was presented with a blank screen on launching the app.

I tried the flag to disable the GPU support, as I had seen that as one solution for a few Ubuntu users, but that wasn’t the solution.

What I was seeing in the logs turned out to not be an issue with the GPU, but an issue with the built-in version of Qt5.  It turns out that there is a bug with respect to running 32-bit sandboxed apps on a 64-bit OS.

/qwebengine/qtwebengine/src/3rdparty/chromium/sandbox/linux/seccomp-bpf-helpers/sigsys_handlers.cc:**CRASHING**:seccomp-bpf failure in syscall 0281

The solution is to add the following value to the arguments passed in on line 4 of the QtWebEngineProcess file located in the /opt/HipChat4/bin directory of the HipChat install:

--disable-seccomp-filter-sandbox

Thanks to the Arch Linux user falstaff_ch for putting this in a comment on the Arch Linux AUR entry page.

Proxmox Package Repositories for non-subscription installs – the foremind

proxmox-logo-150x150-3721198If you ran across my previous post about disabling the Proxmox no subscription pop-up, you might also be wondering why you get an alert on the console regarding the scheduled update job.  The reason that this shows up is that the apt-get update job returns an error code for one of the Proxmox Enterprise repos.

The fix is relatively simple, just reconfigure your sources.list.d contents to not have the pve-enterprise repo, but instead to have the pve-no-subscription repos enabled instead.  The wiki has a nice article on the various package repos used for Proxmox.

Please note that the entry for the pve-no-subscription repo merges the sources.list and the sources.list.d file into one.

Setting package publisher in Solaris 11 – the foremind

During the installation and setup of my new Solaris 11 Automated Installer host, I ran into a situation where even though I was specifying both the origin to remove AND the origin to add, the OS refused to allow me to perform both options in the same command.  While you should be able do this, I ended up having to remove the default system configured publisher and then adding the new local IPS repository as the publisher.

This is what the default publisher was configured for:

[email protected]:~# pkg publisher PUBLISHER TYPE STATUS P LOCATION solaris origin online F http://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release/ [email protected]:~# pkg publisher solaris

            Publisher: solaris
                Alias: 
           Origin URI: http://pkg.oracle.com/solaris/release/
              SSL Key: None
             SSL Cert: None
          Client UUID: 
      Catalog Updated: October  6, 2015 02:41:00 PM 
              Enabled: Yes

Here is the command that was part of the Oracle guide How to Get Started Customizing and Configuring Systems Using the Automated Installer in Oracle Solaris 11.1 which didn’t work for me:

[email protected]:~# pkg set-publisher –G '*' -g http://10.202.46.80 solaris
pkg set-publisher: only one publisher name may be specified
Usage:
        pkg set-publisher [-Ped] [-k ssl_key] [-c ssl_cert]
            [-g origin_to_add|--add-origin=origin_to_add ...]
            [-G origin_to_remove|--remove-origin=origin_to_remove ...]
            [-m mirror_to_add|--add-mirror=mirror_to_add ...]
            [-M mirror_to_remove|--remove-mirror=mirror_to_remove ...]
            [-p repo_uri] [--enable] [--disable] [--no-refresh]
            [--reset-uuid] [--non-sticky] [--sticky]
            [--search-after=publisher]
            [--search-before=publisher]
            [--search-first]
            [--approve-ca-cert=path_to_CA]
            [--revoke-ca-cert=hash_of_CA_to_revoke]
            [--unset-ca-cert=hash_of_CA_to_unset]
            [--set-property name_of_property=value]
            [--add-property-value name_of_property=value_to_add]
            [--remove-property-value name_of_property=value_to_remove]
            [--unset-property name_of_property_to_delete]
            [--proxy proxy to use]
            [publisher]

I tried several different variations of the one line command, however I was met with the same lack of success. In order to achieve the desired result where the local IPS repository was set up for publisher name solaris I had to do an unset of the existing repo and then a set to configure my new repo.

[email protected]:~# pkg unset-publisher solaris Updating package cache 1/1 [email protected]:~# pkg publisher PUBLISHER TYPE STATUS P LOCATION [email protected]:~# pkg set-publisher -g http:// solaris [email protected]:~# pkg publisher PUBLISHER TYPE STATUS P LOCATION solaris origin online F http:/// [email protected]:~# pkg publisher solaris

            Publisher: solaris
                Alias: 
           Origin URI: http:///
              SSL Key: None
             SSL Cert: None
          Client UUID: 
      Catalog Updated: October  6, 2015 07:45:07 PM 
              Enabled: Yes

Software bundling should be opt-in – the foremind

According to the FileZilla FAQ:

FileZilla is free open-source software distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License free of charge.
Basically this means that everyone, including corporate entities, can use FileZilla, including but not limited to private, educational and commercial use.

When you install it you have to opt out of at least one, if not two, bundling offers.  While many installers provide you the opportunity to install a bundled offer, I really think that if you are releasing the software as open-source under the GPL, then you should embrace the spirit of the license and make the included bundles opt-in.  And why you are at it, maybe you could add a section to the FAQ on what the funds for the bundles and the website sponsors are used for.

filezilla_optout2-300x233-6420584 filezilla_optout-300x233-3053142